MIL-STD-810 Humidity Testing

MIL-STD-810, Method 507 Humidity Testing applies to items that are stored or deployed in warm, humid atmospheres.  The purpose of Method 507 Humidity Testing is to determine a product’s resistance to warm, humid environments.  It is intended to provide an indication of potential problems associated with humidity.  MIL-STD-810 Humidity testing provides stressful conditions intended to reveal potential problem areas in material.  It does not attempt to duplicate the complex temperature/humidity environment.  The latest revision is Method 507.6 from MIL-STD-810H.

MIL-STD-810 Method 507 Humidity Testing consists of two procedures, Procedure I – Induced and Natural Cycles and Procedure II – Aggravated.

Adapting to Humid Environments: MIL-STD-810 Testing

Procedure I contains three natural cycles for test items that are open to the environment and three induced (storage and transit) cycles.  The natural humidity cycles are Constant high humidity (Cycle B1), Cyclic high humidity (Cycle B2), and Hot-humid (Cycle B3).  The induced (storage and transit) cycles are Induced constant high humidity (Cycle B1), Induced variable – high humidity (Cycle B2), and Induced hot-humid (Cycle B3). 

Constant high humidity (Cycle B1) represents conditions in heavily forested tropical regions where nearly constant temperature and humidity prevails during rainy and wet seasons with little solar radiation exposure.  Cyclic high humidity (Cycle B2) conditions occur in tropical areas where solar radiation is a factor.  Hot-humid (Cycle B3) is unique to materiel that is deployed specifically in the Persian Gulf or Red Sea regions.  It is not to be used as a substitute for worldwide exposure requirements where B1 or B2 would apply. 

Induced constant high humidity (Cycle B1) is defined as a humid environment with relative humidity above 95 percent with nearly constant 27 °C (80 °F) temperature for periods of a day or more.  Induced variable – high humidity (Cycle B2) conditions occur when material in the cyclic high humidity environment category receives heat from solar radiation with little or no cooling air.  Induced hot-humid (Cycle B3) exists when items in the hot -humid category receive heat from solar radiation with little or no cooling air. 

The test durations for Procedure I are listed in Table 507.6-II from MIL-STD-810H.

high humidity environments table from mil std 810h standard

Procedure II – Aggravated contains more extreme temperature and humidity levels than those found in nature but requires shorter durations.  The advantage of Procedure II is that it produces the effects of temperature-humidity faster than the natural or induced procedures identifying potential problems quicker.  The aggravated 24 hour temperature-humidity cycle from MIL-STD-810H is shown in Figure 507.6-7.  Although the combined 60 °C (140 °F) and 95 percent RH does not occur in nature, this combination of temperature and relative humidity has historically proven to reveal potential defects in most material.  The minimum number of 24-hour aggravated cycles for the test is ten preceded by a 24 hour preconditioning step. 

humidity environments chart showing aggravated temperature-humidity cycle


High Humidity Environment Failures

What are some failures that occur from High Temperature and High Humidity environments?

  • Oxidation and/or galvanic corrosion of metals.
  • Increased chemical reactions.
  • Chemical or electrochemical breakdown of organic and inorganic surface coatings.
  • Changes in friction coefficients, resulting in binding or sticking.
  • Swelling of materials due to sorption effects.
  • Loss of physical strength.
  • Changes to electrical and thermal insulating characteristics.
  • De-lamination of composite materials.
  • Changes in elasticity or plasticity.
  • Degradation of optical element image transmission quality.
  • Degradation of lubricants.
  • Condensation resulting in electrical short circuits.
  • Fogging of optical surfaces.

The is a partial list of potential failures due to high temperature and high humidity environments. These issues underscore the critical need for rigorous and comprehensive humidity testing.

Why Choose DES for Your Humidity Testing?

Choosing the right testing lab for humidity testing can significantly impact the reliability and market readiness of your products. Delserro Engineering Solutions (DES) has a history of serving leading aerospace and military manufacturers as well as having state-of-the-art chambers to replicate the most demanding humid environments.

Why choose DES for your Humidity Testing?

  • DES is an accredited MIL-STD 810 test lab.
  • We have extensive experience and have performed numerous MIL-STD-810 humidity tests. 
  • DES has multiple chambers capable of performing MIL-STD-810, Method 507 Humidity Testing. 
  • DES has performed many MIL-STD-810 tests for leading aerospace and military product manufacturers. 

If your product is required to function in the tropics or in high-humidity environments, contact DES to obtain a free quote and to schedule a MIL-STD-810 humidity test today.

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MIL-STD-810 Solar (Sunshine) Radiation Testing

The purpose of MIL-STD 810, Method 505 Solar Radiation Testing is to evaluate the heating effects of solar radiation on materiel and to identify the actinic (ultraviolet photo degradation) effects of exposure to solar radiation.  The latest revision for radiation testing is Method 505.7 from MIL-STD-810H.

Solar Heating can cause some of the following failures:

  • Jamming or loosening of moving parts.
  • Weakening of solder joints and glued parts.
  • Changes in strength and elasticity.
  • Loss of calibration or malfunction of linkage devices.
  • Loss of seal integrity.
  • Changes in electrical or electronic components.
  • Premature actuation of electrical contacts.
  • Changes in characteristics of elastomers and polymers.
  • Blistering, peeling, and de-lamination of paints, composites, and surface laminates.
  • Softening of potting compounds.
  • Pressure variations.
  • Sweating of composite materials.
  • Difficulty in handling.

Solar Radiation can cause additional failures such as:

  • Fading of labels, fabric, and plastic color.
  • Chalking and fading of paints.
  • Deterioration of plastics through photochemical reactions initiated by shorter wavelength radiation.

MIL-STD-810H Tests for Solar Radiation

MIL-STD-810 Method 505 Solar Radiation has two procedures: Procedure I Cycling and Procedure II Steady State.

Procedure I is meant to investigate the effects of heat produced by solar radiation by exposing products to 24-hour cycles of simulated solar radiation at realistic maximum levels typical throughout the world.  It contains two 24-hour cycles to choose from, A1 and A2.  Category A1 represents the hottest conditions in the most extreme month at the most severe locations throughout the world that experience high temperatures accompanied by high levels of solar radiation.  Category A2 represents less severe conditions at locations that experience high temperatures accompanied by high levels of solar radiation, winds, and moderately low humidity, namely, the most southerly parts of Europe, most of the Australian continent, south central Asia, northern and eastern Africa, coastal regions of north Africa, southern parts of the US, and most of Mexico.  The minimum duration for either cycle is three.  If the maximum peak response temperature from the previous 24-hour cycle is not reached during three cycles, continue cycling until repeated peak temperatures are reached, or for seven cycles, whichever comes first. 

Procedure II is used to evaluate the actinic or photo degradation effects when items are exposed to long periods of sunshine.  It uses intensified solar loading to accelerate actinic effects.  Procedure II produces an acceleration factor of approximately 2.5 times the solar energy experienced in one 24-hour (natural) diurnal cycle plus a 4-hour lights-off period to allow for alternating thermal stressing.  The recommended minimum durations for Procedure II are (10) 24-hour cycles for products that are occasionally used outdoors and (56) 24-hour cycles for products continuously exposed to outdoor conditions. 

Consider the following when determining which procedure and MIL-STD 810H test levels to use for solar radiation testing:

  1. The operational purpose of the test item.
  2. The anticipated areas of deployment.
  3. The test item configuration.
  4. The anticipated exposure circumstances (use, transportation, storage, etc.).
  5. The expected duration of exposure to solar radiation.
  6. The expected problem areas within the test item.

Solar (Sunshine) Testing under MIL-STD-810

Choose DES for your solar (sunshine) testing because:

  • DES is an accredited MIL-STD 810H test lab.
  • We have performed numerous MIL-STD-810H tests for solar radiation. 
  • DES has state-of-the-art solar testing equipment. 

Contact us today to discuss your MIL-STD-810 testing project with one of our engineers. 

DES Advanced Solar Radiation Testing Services

Choosing the right solar radiation testing service is crucial for assessing the durability and longevity of products under solar exposure. DES provides leading-edge solutions in radiation testing, ensuring that your products meet all necessary MIL-STD-810 standards for solar exposure. Our accreditation to MIL-STD-810 and advanced equipment underscore our capability to simulate the effects of solar radiation comprehensively. Engage with our experts to leverage DES’s deep industry knowledge and cutting-edge facilities for your next project.

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DES Lab Centrifuge: Precision Testing at Over 100G

Explore the capabilities of the DES lab centrifuge, designed to simulate extreme operational conditions by generating inertia forces up to and exceeding 100Gs. This facility is tailored for rigorous acceleration testing, ensuring that military and aerospace products can endure the harshest environments.

This facility not only adheres to rigorous international testing standards but also incorporates proprietary DES technologies that enhance test accuracy and reliability. Utilizing our cutting-edge data acquisition systems, we ensure that every test conducted in our lab delivers comprehensive insights into the endurance and operational capabilities of products, setting a new benchmark for quality in acceleration testing.

Centrifuge Testing for High-Performance Products

At DES, centrifuge testing is vital for validating the structural integrity and resilience of components destined for critical applications. Our centrifuge is equipped with advanced slip ring lines that allow for real-time monitoring of power and data transmission, enabling precise assessments of product behavior under significant G-forces.


Our centrifuge facility plays a critical role in preemptively identifying potential failures, thereby enhancing product durability before they enter strenuous real-world applications. This proactive approach to product testing helps our clients save on costly post-deployment repairs and replacements, ensuring that their products are both robust and reliable from the outset.

Call us today to schedule your product for our advanced centrifuge testing and ensure its readiness for any operational challenge.

Acceleration Testing for Military and Aerospace Applications

Our centrifuge services are indispensable for products that must meet the highest standards of reliability and safety. By replicating the intense forces encountered during military operations and space missions, we provide essential data that helps refine product designs to withstand any challenge they might face in actual deployment.

Discover Our Lab Centrifuge’s Advanced Features

Watch our latest video to see the DES lab centrifuge in action, where it tests the limits of aerospace and military products with unparalleled precision. This demonstration shows the smooth operation of our centrifuge while achieving significant G Forces.

Contact us for a deeper understanding of how our centrifuge testing can benefit your product development

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MIL-STD-810 Temperature Shock Testing

Method 503 in MIL-STD-810 covers procedures for temperature shock or thermal shock testing.  Temperature shock testing (as defined in MIL-STD-810H) is a rapid change in air temperature greater than 10°C (18°F) per minute.  Temperature shock testing is used to determine if products can withstand sudden changes in the surrounding temperature environment without experiencing physical damage or deterioration in performance.   The latest revision is Method 503.7 from MIL-STD-810H.

Some of the Effects of Temperature Shock Environments are:

  • Shattering of glass and optical material.
  • Binding or slackening of moving parts.
  • Differential contraction or expansion rates or induced strain rates of dissimilar materials.
  • Deformation or fracture of components.
  • Cracking of surface coatings.
  • Leaking of sealed compartments.
  • Failure of insulation protection.
  • Changes in electrical and electronic components.
  • Electronic or mechanical failures due to frost formation.

Method 503 Has One Procedure with Four Variations:

  1. Procedure I-A – One-way Shock(s) from Constant Extreme Temperature
    This procedure is for material that is only rarely exposed to thermal shock in one direction.  At least one shock is performed from low to high temperature, or vice versa. 
  2. Procedure I-B – Single Cycle Shock from Constant Extreme Temperature.  For items that are exposed to only one thermal shock cycle (one in each direction).  One shock is performed from low-to-high temperature (or vice versa) and then one shock in the opposite direction.
  3. Procedure I-C – Multi-Cycle Shocks from Constant Extreme Temperature.  A minimum of three shocks are performed at each condition, i.e., three transfers from cold to hot, three transfers from hot to cold, and a stabilization period after each transfer. 
  4. Procedure I-D – Shocks to or from Controlled Ambient Temperature.  Procedure I-D follows the durations of Procedures I-A to I-C, except all shocks are to and/or from controlled ambient temperatures. 

Test levels for MIL-STD-810 Temperature Shock Testing 

Consider the following typical conditions from MIL-STD-810H:

  1. Aircraft flight exposure. For materiel exposed to desert or tropical ground heat with possible direct solar heating, then, immediately afterwards, exposed to the extreme low temperatures associated with high altitude.  The item could be subjected to multiple thermal shocks occurring in multiple missions. 
  2. Air delivery – desert. For products that are delivered over desert terrain from unheated, high altitude aircraft, then exposed to hot ambient air temperature (no solar loading).
  3. Ground transfer – ambient to or from either cold regions or desert. For items that move from a controlled ambient indoor environment or enclosure to a cold region or desert environment.

For MIL-STD-810 temperature shock testing, the transfer time between the temperatures should be within one minute.  The test sample is soaked for as long as necessary to ensure a uniform temperature throughout at least its outer portions.  If the Life Cycle Environmental Profile indicates a duration less than that required to achieve stabilization, this duration should be used.  If the critical point of interest is near the surface of the item, a shorter duration may apply rather than complete stabilization of the item.

H4: Choosing DES for MIL-STD-810 Temperature Shock Testing

When it comes to MIL-STD-810 Temperature Shock Testing, selecting the right laboratory is crucial for accurate and reliable results. DES stands out for several reasons:

  • DES has run numerous MIL-STD-810 Method 503.7 Temperature Shock tests for many military manufacturers
  • DES’s lab is A2LA accredited to MIL-STD-810, Method 503 Temperature Shock Testing
  • DES has multiple chambers capable of performing MIL-STD-810 Temperature Shock compliance testing

Contact us today to discuss your MIL-STD-810 testing with one of our engineers. 

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MIL-STD-810 Low Temperature Testing

MIL-STD 810, Method 502 Low Temperature Testing is used to evaluate the effects of low temperatures on cold storage, operation, and manipulation.  Method 502 is applicable for testing products that will be exposed to cold temperatures during their life cycle.  The latest revision is Method 502.7 from MIL-STD-810H.

MIL-STD-810 low temperature testing is not intended to simulate a high altitude, low temperature environment associated with an unpressurized aircraft at altitude.  However, it may be used in combination with Method 500.6 to simulate a high altitude, low temperature environment. 

Some of the Effects of Low Temperature Environments are:

  • Hardening and embrittlement of materials.
  • Binding of parts from differential contraction of dissimilar materials.
  • Loss of lubrication and lubricant flow due to increased viscosity.
  • Changes in electronic components (resistors, capacitors, etc.).
  • Changes in performance of transformers and electromechanical components.
  • Stiffening of shock mounts.
  • Cracking, change in impact strength, and reduced strength.
  • Effects due to condensation and freezing of water in or on the materiel.

Method 502 Has Three Procedures Starting with Low Temperature Storage:

  1. Procedure I – Storage.  Procedure I is used to evaluate products that are stored at Low temperatures.  After the Low temperature storage test is completed, an operational test at ambient conditions is performed. 
  2. Procedure II – Operation.  Procedure II is used to determine how well an item will operate in low temperature environments.  Operation during this procedure assumes minimum contact by personnel.
  3. Procedure III – Manipulation.  Manipulation is used to investigate the ease with which the materiel can be assembled, operated, and disassembled by personnel wearing heavy, cold-weather clothing. In addition, this could also include maintenance procedures. 

Low Temperature Test Parameters and Procedures Under MIL-STD-810 

First, identify the Low temperature test parameters and applicable procedures. DES can help determine the appropriate low temperature test conditions based on the equipment’s intended use.  Consider the following cold temperatures in various world-wide locations from Table 502.7-I. (MIL-STD-810H):

Design TypeLocationAmbient Air Temperature oC(oF)Induced Environment Temperature
(Storage & Transit)
oC(oF)
Basic Cold (C1)Most of Europe; Northern contiguous US; Costal Canada; High-Latitude coasts (e.g., southern coast of Alaska); High elevations in lower latitudes-21 to -32
(-5 to -25)
-25 to -33
(-13 to -28)
Cold (C2)Canada, Alaska (excluding the interior); Northern Scandinavia; Northern Asia (some areas), High Elevations (Northern and Southern Hemispheres); Alps; Himalayas; Andes-37 to -46
(-35 to -50)
-37 to -46
(-35 to -50)
Severe Cold (C3)Interior of Alaska; Yukon (Canada); Interior of Northern Canadian Islands; Greenland ice cap; Northern Asia-51
(-60)
-51
(-60)
Source: Table 502.7-I. (MIL-STD-810H)

The recommended test duration from MIL-STD-810H is four hours after stabilization for nonhazardous or non-safety-related (non-life-support type) material.  Munitions, rubber and plastics may continue to deteriorate following low temperature stabilization.  For these items, a minimum duration of 72 hours following temperature stabilization is recommended.  For restrained glass, ceramics, and glass-type products (such as those used in optical systems, laser systems, and electronic systems) a minimum storage period of 24 hours following temperature stabilization is recommended. 

Advantages of MIL-STD-810H Low Temperature Testing with DES:

DES excels in MIL-STD-810H Low Temperature Testing. With our lab’s accreditation and equipped with advanced temperature chambers, we ensure your equipment meets the cold-weather performance standards required by MIL-STD-810H.  Some of the reasons that DES is trusted by many companies for MIL-STD-810H Low Temperature Testing are:

  • DES has extensive experience running MIL-STD-810 Method 502.7 Low Temperature tests
  • DES’s lab is A2LA accredited to MIL-STD-810, Method 502 Low Temperature Testing
  • DES is trusted by many military manufacturers to perform their testing
  • DES has numerous temperature chambers capable of performing MIL-STD-810 Low temperature compliance testing

Contact us today to discuss testing your product in our MIL-STD-810 accredited Test Laboratory. 

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MIL-STD-810 High Temperature Testing

MIL-STD 810, Method 501 High Temperature Testing is used to evaluate the effects of high temperature conditions on performance, materials, and integrity.  Method 501 is applicable for temperature testing products that are deployed in areas where temperatures (ambient or induced) are higher than standard ambient.  Note, the latest revision of this method is 501.7 from MIL-STD-810H.

Method 501 is limited to evaluating the effects of relatively short-term (months, as opposed to years), even distributions of heat throughout the test item. This method is not typically practical for evaluating materials where solar radiation produces thermal gradients or photochemical effects.  Method 505 is used to test the effects of solar radiation.  It is also not practical to evaluate degradation that occurs from continuous long-term exposure to high temperatures where synergetic effects may be involved.

The following are typical failures that could occur from products used in high temperature environments.

  • Parts bind from the differential expansion of dissimilar materials.
  • Lubricants become less viscous; joints lose lubrication by the outward flow of lubricants.
  • Materials change in dimension.
  • Packing, gaskets, seals, bearings, and shafts become distorted, bind, and fail causing mechanical failures.
  • Gaskets display permanent sets.
  • Closure and sealing strips deteriorate.
  • Fixed-resistance resistors change in values.
  • Electronic circuit stability varies with differences in temperature gradients and differential expansion of dissimilar materials.
  • Transformers and electromechanical components overheat.
  • Operating/release margins of relays and magnetic or thermally activated devices alter.
  • Shortened operating lifetimes.
  • High pressures are created within sealed cases (batteries, etc.).
  • Discoloration, cracking, or crazing of organic materials.
  • Out-gassing of composite materials or coatings.
  • Failure of adhesives.

MIL-STD-810 Method 501 Tests: High Temperature Procedures

  1. Procedure I – Storage.  Procedure I is for testing products that are stored at high temperatures.  After the high temperature storage test is completed, an operational test at ambient conditions is performed.  Procedure I can be either a cyclic temperature test or a constant temperature test. 
  2. Procedure II – Operation.  Procedure II is used to investigate how high temperatures could affect the performance of items while they are operating.  Temperature Procedure II can be performed as either a cyclic temperature test or a constant temperature test. 
  3. Procedure III – Tactical-Standby to Operational.  This temperature procedure evaluates the material’s performance at normal operating temperatures after being presoaked at high non-operational temperatures.  An example of Procedure III is a product that is stored in an enclosed environment that develops high internal temperatures before being removed and then operated in a relatively short period of time.

What is the procedure for MIL-STD-810 High Temperature Testing? 

First, identify the high temperature levels, test conditions, and applicable procedures. DES can help determine the appropriate temperature ramp rates and durations of the tests based on the equipment’s intended use and the operating environmental conditions.  Consider the following climatic temperatures from Table 501.7-I. (MIL-STD-810H):

Design TypeLocationAmbient Air oC (oF)Induced2 oC (oF)
Basic Hot (A2)Many parts of the world, extending outward from the hot dry category of southwestern United States, northwestern Mexico, central and western Australia, Saharan Africa, South America, Southern Spain, and southwest and south central Asia.30 – 43

(86 – 11)
30 – 63

(86 – 145)
Hot Dry (A1)Southwest and south central Asia, southwestern United States, Saharan Africa, central and western Australia, and northwestern Mexico.32 – 49

(90 – 120)
33 – 71

(91 – 160)
Table 501.7-I from MIL-STD-810H

Next, determine whether a constant temperature test or a cyclic temperature test is appropriate.  Constant temperature testing is used only for items situated near heat-producing equipment or when it is necessary to verify the operation of an item at a specified constant temperature.  The duration for constant temperature test temperature is at least two hours following test specimen stabilization.

For cyclic exposure, there are two 24-hour cyclic profiles contained in Tables 501.7-II and 501.7-III.  The number of cycles for the Procedure I storage test is a minimum of seven to coincide with the one percent frequency of occurrence of the hours of extreme temperatures during the most severe month in an average year at the most severe location.   The minimum number of cycles for the Procedure II operational testing is three. This number is normally sufficient for the test item to reach its maximum response temperature.

You can trust the DES MIL-STD-810 High Temperature Testing lab

Advantages with DES : 

  • DES is A2LA accredited to MIL-STD-810, Method 501 High Temperature Testing
  • DES has extensive experience running MIL-STD-810 Method 501.7 high temperature Tests
  • DES has multiple temperature chambers capable of performing MIL-STD-810 high temperature compliance testing

Contact us today to to discuss testing your product in our MIL-STD-810 accredited Test Laboratory. 

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MIL-STD-810 Low Pressure (Altitude) Testing

In the demanding realms of aerospace and defense, ensuring that products can withstand the rigors of high-altitude environments is paramount. MIL-STD 810 is a Department of Defense Test Standard for environmental engineering considerations and laboratory tests.  Method 500 in MIL-STD-810 defines procedures for low-pressure (altitude) testing.  The latest revision of this method is 500.6 from MIL-STD-810H.

Altitude Testing Services at Delserro Engineering Solutions

At Delserro Engineering Solutions, our altitude testing services are designed to meet the rigorous demands of the aerospace and defense industries. By employing the comprehensive procedures outlined in MIL-STD-810H Method 500.6, we ensure that every product undergoes thorough low pressure testing under simulated high-altitude conditions. The altitude test chambers at Delserro Engineering Solutions (DES) can meet the requirements of MIL-STD-810H (and previous revisions) accurately ensuring that products are not just compliant but are primed for operational excellence.

MIL-STD-810 altitude testing services are tailored to products that:

  1. Operate or are stored at significant elevations.
  2. Experience pressurized or unpressurized conditions in aircraft.
  3. Could undergo rapid or explosive decompression.
  4. Are externally mounted on aircraft and exposed to extreme conditions.

Method 500 is not intended for items that are installed or operated in space vehicles, aircraft, or missiles that fly at altitudes above 21,300 m (70,000 ft). 

The following are typical failures that could occur from products used in a high altitude (low pressure) environment:

  1. Leakage of gases or fluids from gasket-sealed enclosures
  2. Deformation, rupture, or explosion of sealed containers
  3. Change in physical and chemical properties of low-density materials
  4. Overheating of materiel due to reduced heat transfer
  5. Evaporation of lubricants
  6. Erratic starting and operation of engines
  7. Failure of hermetic seals
  8. Erratic operation or malfunction of materiel resulting from arcing or corona

MIL-STD-810 Method 500.6 Insights for Low Pressure Testing

MIL-STD-810 Method 500.6 has four procedures:

  1. Procedure I – Storage/Air Transport. Procedure I is for testing material that is transported or stored at high ground elevations or transported by air in its shipping/storage configuration.
  2. Procedure II – Operation/Air Carriage. Procedure II is used to test the performance of products operated at high altitudes.  It may be preceded by Procedure I.
  3. Procedure III – Rapid Decompression.  Procedure III is for determining if a rapid decrease in cabin pressure will cause a failure or malfunction that would endanger nearby personnel the ground vehicle or the aircraft in which it is being transported.
  4. Procedure IV – Explosive Decompression. Procedure IV is similar to Procedure III except that it involves an instantaneous decrease in pressure.

How is MIL-STD-810 Low Pressure Testing performed?  First, it is necessary to determine the test parameters such as test altitude (pressure) and temperature, rate of change of pressure (and temperature if appropriate), duration of exposure, and test item configuration based upon the Life Cycle Environmental Profile.  Once the parameters are defined, low pressure testing is performed by placing the specimen in a specialized chamber that simulates altitude by controlling pressure and temperature.  Upon completion of the altitude test, DES will promptly deliver a detailed test report that includes the customer’s name and address, the test dates, a summary of the test procedure, equipment & measuring system calibration information, plots of altitude and temperature, test observations & results, color pictures of the altitude test setup and color pictures of any failures. 

Why Choose DES for MIL-STD-810 Low Pressure (Altitude) Testing

  • A2LA Accreditation: Our laboratory’s accreditation is a testament to our commitment to quality and excellence in environmental testing.  DES is A2LA accredited to MIL-STD-810 Low Pressure (Altitude) Testing.
  • Trusted by Industry Leaders: Our state-of-the-art testing facilities, experienced engineering team, and track record of success has made us the number one choice of top defense contractors.
  • Advanced Testing Capabilities: With equipment capable of simulating altitudes from below sea level to as high as 1,000,000 feet and temperatures ranging from -75°C to +150°C, we can accommodate a wide variety of testing requirements.

Contact us today to discuss how our altitude testing services can contribute to the success and reliability of your next project.

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What Exactly is MIL-STD 810?

MIL-STD 810 is a Department of Defense Test Method Standard for environmental engineering considerations and laboratory tests.  It is the most popular Military specification used to conduct environmental testing of military products.  It exists so as to ensure that products used for defense-related purposes meet very specific requirements with regard to ruggedness, durability, and performance.  Given the fact that these products may be exposed to harsh or even extreme conditions, their reliability under stress is essential

Continue reading What Exactly is MIL-STD 810?

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MIL-STD 810, Method 516, Shock Testing Procedure V – Crash Hazard Shock

This is another part of a series of blog posts concerning the MIL-STD 810 Shock Section, Method 516.  This blog was written with reference to MIL-STD-810G w/Change 1 dated 15 April 2014.  DES has the experience and expertise to run your MIL-STD-810 test.  For more information, please check out our DES shock testing services page and our other MIL-STD-810 shock testing blog articles:

MIL-STD 810, Method 516, Shock Testing Overview

MIL-STD 810, Method 516, Shock Testing Procedure I – Functional Shock

MIL-STD 810, Method 516, Shock Testing Procedure II – Transportation Shock

MIL-STD 810, Method 516, Shock Testing Procedure III – Fragility

MIL-STD 810, Method 516, Shock Testing Procedure IV – Transit Drop

Crash hazard shocks apply to materiel mounted in air or ground vehicles.  Shock testing according to Procedure V of MIL-STD 810, Method 516 is intended to test the strength of products during a crash situation to verify that parts do not break apart, eject and become a safety hazard.  Failures of this nature could cause dangerous projectiles that could impact occupants or create significant damage to the vehicle.

This article will focus on the shock test condition when measured field data is not available and the testing will use classical shock impulses.  The terminal peak sawtooth is the default classical shock pulse to be used for this condition.  Figure 516.7-10 from MIL-STD-810 shows its shape and tolerance limits.  Table 516.7-IV contains the terminal peak sawtooth default test parameters for Procedure V – Crash Hazard Shock.  In limited cases a half sine shock impulse is specified.  Its shape and tolerance limits are shown in Figure 516.7-12.

Continue reading MIL-STD 810, Method 516, Shock Testing Procedure V – Crash Hazard Shock

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MIL-STD 810, Method 516, Shock Testing Procedure IV – Transit Drop

This is another part of a series of blog posts concerning the MIL-STD 810 Shock Section, Method 516.  This blog was written with reference to MIL-STD-810G w/Change 1 dated 15 April 2014.  DES has the experience and expertise to run your MIL-STD-810 test.  For more information, please check out our DES shock testing services page and our other MIL-STD-810 shock testing blog articles:

MIL-STD 810, Method 516, Shock Testing Overview

MIL-STD 810, Method 516, Shock Testing Procedure I – Functional Shock

MIL-STD 810, Method 516, Shock Testing Procedure II – Transportation Shock

MIL-STD 810, Method 516, Shock Testing Procedure III – Fragility

Method 516, Procedure IV is for testing products that could be accidently dropped such as when they are removed from a shelve or dropped when handling.  The test item is physically dropped onto a hard surface to produce the shock.  Products can be tested inside their transit case or unpackaged.  Typically, they would be tested in the configuration that is normally used for transportation, handling, or a combat situation.

Continue reading MIL-STD 810, Method 516, Shock Testing Procedure IV – Transit Drop

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