MIL-STD 810, Method 516, Shock Testing Procedure VI – Bench Handling

This is the final part of a series of blog posts concerning the MIL-STD 810 Shock Section, Method 516.  This blog was written with reference to MIL-STD-810G w/Change 1 dated 15 April 2014.  DES has the experience and expertise to run your MIL-STD-810 test.  For more information, please check out our DES shock testing services page and our other MIL-STD-810 shock testing blog articles:

MIL-STD 810, Method 516, Shock Testing Overview

MIL-STD 810, Method 516, Shock Testing Procedure I – Functional Shock

MIL-STD 810, Method 516, Shock Testing Procedure II – Transportation Shock

MIL-STD 810, Method 516, Shock Testing Procedure III – Fragility

MIL-STD 810, Method 516, Shock Testing Procedure IV – Transit Drop

MIL-STD 810, Method 516, Shock Testing Procedure V – Crash Hazard Shock

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MIL-STD 810, Method 516, Shock Testing Procedure V – Crash Hazard Shock

This is another part of a series of blog posts concerning the MIL-STD 810 Shock Section, Method 516.  This blog was written with reference to MIL-STD-810G w/Change 1 dated 15 April 2014.  DES has the experience and expertise to run your MIL-STD-810 test.  For more information, please check out our DES shock testing services page and our other MIL-STD-810 shock testing blog articles:

MIL-STD 810, Method 516, Shock Testing Overview

MIL-STD 810, Method 516, Shock Testing Procedure I – Functional Shock

MIL-STD 810, Method 516, Shock Testing Procedure II – Transportation Shock

MIL-STD 810, Method 516, Shock Testing Procedure III – Fragility

MIL-STD 810, Method 516, Shock Testing Procedure IV – Transit Drop

Crash hazard shocks apply to materiel mounted in air or ground vehicles.  Shock testing according to Procedure V of MIL-STD 810, Method 516 is intended to test the strength of products during a crash situation to verify that parts do not break apart, eject and become a safety hazard.  Failures of this nature could cause dangerous projectiles that could impact occupants or create significant damage to the vehicle.

This article will focus on the shock test condition when measured field data is not available and the testing will use classical shock impulses.  The terminal peak sawtooth is the default classical shock pulse to be used for this condition.  Figure 516.7-10 from MIL-STD-810 shows its shape and tolerance limits.  Table 516.7-IV contains the terminal peak sawtooth default test parameters for Procedure V – Crash Hazard Shock.  In limited cases a half sine shock impulse is specified.  Its shape and tolerance limits are shown in Figure 516.7-12.

Continue Reading MIL-STD 810, Method 516, Shock Testing Procedure V – Crash Hazard Shock

MIL-STD 810, Method 516, Shock Testing Procedure II – Transportation Shock

This is another part of a series of blog posts concerning the MIL-STD 810 Shock Section, Method 516.  This blog was written with reference to MIL-STD-810G w/Change 1 dated 15 April 2014.  DES has the experience and expertise to run your MIL-STD-810 test.  For more information, please check out our DES shock testing services page and our other MIL-STD-810 shock testing blog articles:

MIL-STD 810, Method 516, Shock Testing Overview

MIL-STD 810, Method 516, Shock Testing Procedure I – Functional Shock

Continue Reading MIL-STD 810, Method 516, Shock Testing Procedure II – Transportation Shock

MIL-STD 810, Method 516, Shock Testing Procedure I – Functional Shock

This is part two of a series of blog posts concerning the MIL-STD 810 Shock Section, Method 516.  This blog was written with reference to MIL-STD-810G w/Change 1 dated 15 April 2014.  DES has the experience and expertise to run your MIL-STD-810 test.  For more information, please check out our DES shock testing services page and our other MIL-STD-810 shock testing blog articles:

MIL-STD 810, Method 516, Shock Testing Overview

Shock testing according to Procedure I of MIL-STD 810, Method 516 is intended to test products while they are operating to see if any functional problems occur and to determine if they survive without damage.  The applied shocks usually represent those that may be encountered during operational service.  This article will focus on the shock test condition when measured field data is not available and the testing will use classical shock impulses.  The terminal peak sawtooth is the default classical shock pulse to be used for this condition.  Figure 516.7-10 from MIL-STD-810 shows its shape and tolerance limits.  Table 516.7-IV contains the terminal peak sawtooth default test parameters for Procedure I -Functional Test.  In limited cases a half sine shock impulse is specified.  Its shape and tolerance limits are shown in Figure 516.7-12.

Continue Reading MIL-STD 810, Method 516, Shock Testing Procedure I – Functional Shock

MIL-STD 810, Method 516, Shock Testing Overview

This is part one of a series of blog posts concerning the MIL-STD 810 Shock Section, Method 516.  This blog was written with reference to MIL-STD-810G w/Change 1 dated 15 April 2014.  DES has the experience and expertise to run your MIL-STD-810 test.  For more information, please check out our DES shock testing services page. 

MIL-STD-810 is a public military test standard that is designed to assist in the environmental engineering considerations for product design and testing.  For the purposes of this blog series we will focus on Method 516.7, Shock Testing.

The purpose of shock testing is to:

  1. Evaluate if a product can withstand shocks encountered in handling, transportation, and service environments
  2. Determine the product’s fragility level
  3. Test the strength of devices during a crash situation to verify that parts do not break apart, eject and become a safety hazard

Continue Reading MIL-STD 810, Method 516, Shock Testing Overview

Qualification Testing on Aerospace Connectors

DES recently performed qualification testing on aerospace connectors which involved combined temperature and sinusoidal vibration testing, random vibration testing and shock testing.  Combined temperature and sinusoidal vibration tests were performed per EIA 364-28F EIA 364-28F required test conditions of 10-2000 Hz, 20G maximum acceleration sweeps at temperatures of -54°C and 200°C over the course of 4 hours per axis.  Random vibration tests were also performed per EIA 364-28F.  Random vibrations at 50-2000 Hz, 46.3 Grms were applied to the connectors for 8 hours per axis.  The random vibrations were applied at room temperature.  Finally, the connectors were subjected half sine shocks per EIA 364-27C.  The shock requirements were three shocks per polarity, per axis at 300G over the duration of 3msec.  A sample shock plot can be seen in Figure 1.

Sample Shock Testing Chart

Figure 1 – Sample Shock Test Plot

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Vibration Response of Products

vibration response

Tacoma Narrows Bridge collapse, caused by improperly designed structure

Vibration of a mechanical system can be descried as an oscillatory motion about an equilibrium point. Certain vibrations of mechanical systems can be considered desirable, such as in musical instruments like a tuning fork or guitar.

However, often times vibrations of mechanical systems are undesirable, producing wasted energy, unwanted noise and catastrophic failures. Therefore it is critical during the product design phase that engineers are able to accurately characterize the vibration response of the system in order to ensure a safe and reliable product for their customers. We accomplish this through comprehensive vibration testing services.

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Shock Testing: Long Duration Half Sine Shock

Shock testing with long durations can be a challenging endeavor. DES recently had to perform a 35G peak, half sine shock with a 50 millisecond duration. The video below shows this shock test being performed.

This sounds like an easy shock to carry out because a peak of 35G is low compared to many shocks. However, this is a difficult shock to perform because 50 milliseconds is a long duration. Most typical shock durations are less than 20 milliseconds.

A half sine shock impulse has the shape of a half sine wave. More details can be found elsewhere on our blog, in an article titled “Classical Shock Testing“.

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DES Performs Testing for Orion Rocket Program

delta4hvy-bkgrdDelserro Engineering Solutions (DES) was proud to be a part of the recent Orion rocket that launched on December 5th 2014. DES was contracted by a local manufacturer to help qualify their product designs for use on Lockheed Martin’s Orion rocket. DES’s role was to perform specialized shock testing on their products.

Some of the shock levels were over 3200 G’s to simulate the rugged launch environment. Both the local manufacturer and Lockheed Martin Corporation were pleased with the testing. Their products successfully passed the shock tests at DES. They acknowledged DES’s role and informed DES that their products operated successfully during the launch!

What sets DES apart from other labs is our in depth experience and technical capability to understand and reproduce the most complicated vibration and shock profiles. DES continues to perform the most complex vibration and shock tests on products that are used in outer space, rockets, missiles, automotive & truck environments, military environments, hospitals, etc.